Ooey Gooey Deliciousness – Momofuku Cornflake Chocolate Chip Marshmallow Cookies

I’m a little late on jumping on the Momofuku bandwagon. For the past few years, I’ve been hearing all of the hype about Momofuku, especially the desserts from Milk Bar. There are raving reviews of the inventive cookie and cake creations of Chef Christina Tosi, from the corn cookies to the birthday crumb cake. So when I saw her cookbook, Milk, was at my public library, I put my name down on the waiting list to check it out. I was so happy to finally get my hands on those crazy recipes!

Having heard about some of Tosi’s desserts before and how complex they were, I decided to tackle one of the easier recipes. The Cornflake Chocolate Chip Marshmallow Cookies were just a slight departure from the classical chocolate chip cookie recipe, but had enough craziness to satisfy my preference for non-traditional, exotic desserts. These cookies add a twist to normal chocolate chip cookies with a cornflake crunch and marshmallows.

Before trying this recipe, I looked it up online to get some tips from food bloggers who had tried it before. Tosi and other bloggers strongly recommend using a stand mixer (i.e. Kitchen Aid mixer) to cream the butter and sugar. Luckily, my roommate got one for a Christmas present a few years ago and added it to our kitchen. (I want to say that using a hand mixer would be a fine substitute for a stand mixer, but since there is so much emphasis on using  a stand mixer and I didn’t try this recipe using a hand mixer, I’m not qualified to make that claim.)

The cookies bake very quickly and ended up spreading out quite a bit. It was a little difficult to tell when they were done since they were so thin and the marshmallows melted and puddled into the dough. So, if you like thin and crispy cookies, this recipe is for you! I think the two sticks of butter may be a bit excessive and all of the fat probably caused the cookies to spread out so much. I probably also should have made smaller sized scoops of cookie dough to reduce the spreading.

Despite having a few imperfections, these cookies were AMAZING! I can’t tell you how many compliments I received from friends and lab mates who ate them. Some people said these cookies reminded them of rice crispy treats with the cornflake crunch and marshmallows. FYI: you can definitely tell these cookies contain two sticks of butter, not only from the taste, but also from the slight greasiness of the cookies. These cookies are the definition of indulgence, from the buttery dough and cornflake crunch to the gooey marshmallows and chocolate chips. Although I experienced a few mishaps with these cookies, they were definitely worth the effort!

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Restaurant Review: Momofuku Noodle Bar

I recently visited New York City and one of the top places to visit was Momofuku. Having heard so much praise for David Chang’s restaurant, I made sure to eat there at least once. Last Monday, I visited the Momofuku Noodle Bar in the East Village for lunch with a friend.

Because one of the most talked about dishes served at Momofuku is the pork buns, I knew I had to try them. An order comes with two fluffy white buns filled with a large slab of pork belly, hoisin sauce, scallions, and pickled cucumbers. When I first saw them, I was a bit shocked at how much fat was in the pork belly. I know that’s the best part, but for me, a thick layer of fat was not really that appetizing. Although the fat was buttery and melted in my mouth, I had a hard time eating all of it and felt there wasn’t enough flavor in the meat. The buns could definitely have used more sauce and more pickles, which were a nice way to cut the richness of the fatty pork belly. Don’t get me wrong, the pork buns were good, just not as good as I had imagined from people’s raving reviews.

My friend and I ordered the Momofuku ramen to share, and I’m glad we did. The ramen comes in a huge bowl and was more than enough for the both of us. The broth was a bit salty for my taste and had a slight bitterness. My friend suspected it came from seaweed, which makes sense since dashi, which is a traditional Japanese cooking stock made from kombu (dried seaweed), is usually the base for ramen broth. The ramen noodles were a bit more springy than those I’ve eaten before, almost as if they weren’t cooked enough. The springiness made it a bit harder to chew the noodles, but I suppose I’d rather have springy noodles instead of soggy ones. Another unusual thing about this ramen was that it had a poached egg instead of a soft-boiled or hard-boiled egg, which is commonly found in ramen. Neither of us understood why a poached egg would be served because when we split it open, all of the yolk spilled out into the soup. Although the egg yolk did make the broth taste better in my opinion, it didn’t really make sense to have a runny egg in soup.

Now, I’m probably being a bit more critical than I ought to be. Don’t get me wrong, the food was pretty good and the service was great. But I was expecting a bit more out of Momofuku. I’m sure it was really good when it first started, which is why it probably earned so many accolades. But now, all of those reviews have built up the expectations for Momofuku to be so high that it’s difficult for it to continue to amaze diners. At least, that’s one of my theories. What should probably be praised more than the food is the fact that Momofuku and David Chang reinvented traditional Asian dishes and brought them into the spotlight again. He’s helped mainstream pork buns and ramen  and thanks to him, people think of ramen as being more than just instant noodles.